Spread bets and CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 70% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading spread bets and CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how spread bets and CFDs work, and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.
Spread bets and CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage.

McLaren listing

Discover how to get exposure to McLaren shares via trading or investing with the world’s No.1 provider of CFDs and spread bets.1

Start trading today. Call 0800 195 3100 or email newaccountenquiries.uk@ig.com. We’re available from 8am to 6pm (UK time), Monday to Friday.

Contact us: 0800 195 3100

Start trading today. Call 0800 195 3100 or email newaccountenquiries.uk@ig.com. We’re available from 8am to 6pm (UK time), Monday to Friday.

Contact us: 0800 195 3100

Why trade McLaren's listing with us?

Buy McLaren stock

Invest in McLaren with a share dealing account

Speculate on McLaren

Trade McLaren shares and speculate on rising or falling prices

Trade using leverage

Open a position on McLaren shares with just a small initial deposit

What's on this page?

What's on this page?

McLaren listing: how to buy or trade McLaren shares

When McLaren lists, you'll be able to get exposure to McLaren shares with us by:

Trading vs investing in McLaren shares

Trading and investing are different in a number of ways. When trading McLaren shares with us, you’ll use spread bets or CFDs to speculate on share price movements. Because you don’t own any underlying assets when trading, you can speculate on both rising and falling prices. Further, CFD trading and spread betting have various tax benefits.2

With us, you’ll trade on leverage, meaning that you’ll only need a small deposit – known as margin – to open your position, while still getting exposure to the full value of the trade. Margin isn’t a direct cost to you, but it can have a big impact on the affordability of your trade. Leverage increases both your possible profits and losses. If your prediction about McLaren’s share price movement is correct, you’ll make a profit – if it is incorrect, you’ll incur a loss.

When investing in shares with us, you’ll buy and own physical shares using a share dealing account. Because you’ll own the underlying asset, you’ll make a profit if you sell your shares at a higher price compared to what you paid for them. If you sell your shares at a lower share price, you’ll incur a loss.

To get started, you’ll need the full value of your investment. Note that investing in stock means you could receive dividends if the company pays them, and you will have shareholder rights.

Open a share trading account in minutes

Open a share trading account in minutes

Fast execution on a huge range of markets

Enjoy flexible access to more than 17,000 global markets, with reliable execution

Deal seamlessly, wherever you are

Trade on the move with our natively designed, award-winning trading app

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With 45 years of experience, we’re proud to offer a truly market-leading service

Open a share trading account in minutes

Open a share trading account in minutes

Fast execution on a huge range of markets

Enjoy flexible access to more than 17,000 global markets, with reliable execution

Deal seamlessly, wherever you are

Trade on the move with our natively designed, award-winning trading app

Feel secure with a trusted provider

With 45 years of experience, we’re proud to offer a truly market-leading service

Start trading now

Log in to your account now to access today’s opportunity in a huge range of markets.

Start trading now

Log in to your account now to access today’s opportunity in a huge range of markets.

McLaren listing: what you need to know

The anticipated McLaren listing is 2021’s hot topic. There has already been a round of funding from a group led by MSP Sports Capital, which is said to have obtained a significant minority stake in December 2020.

The group will inject around £185 million over a two-year period into the car manufacturer’s racing division. McLaren hopes this will be enough to keep it at the front of the pack during the Covid-19 pandemic and the subsequent economic recovery.

There are also rumours that the company plans to go public through a reverse takeover. The carmaker is considering a deal with a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC), which will enable McLaren to go public as a means of raising funds.

McLaren is in the process of a wider restructuring in order to reduce its debt levels. The company plans to raise between £300 million and £500 million in a fresh equity injection in order to pay down debt, before refinancing its bonds in 2021.

McLaren IPO vs reverse takeover

Reverse takeovers happen when a private company merges with a public company. McLaren is opting to go public through a reverse takeover as it will enable the company to list shares without sacrificing the time and money it takes to list shares on an exchange. The deal with MSP will not only facilitate a listing, but it will also give McLaren the boost it needs to reduce its debt.

In short, a reverse takeover is a shortcut for a company to become publicly-listed. It happens much faster, costs less, and does not subject a company to the same regulatory scrutiny that would be required for a conventional IPO.

What is McLaren's business model?

McLaren’s business model is focused on three key divisions: McLaren Automotive, McLaren Racing and McLaren Applied (technology sector). With innovation at its core, McLaren continues to diversify its business interests – and it’s this approach that has led to partnership with companies that could help it solve industry-wide challenges, including GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Deloitte.

Since McLaren’s racing arm was born (1963), it has won more than 180 Formula 1 races and 20 World Championships. As at December 2020, McLaren has 12 vehicle models for sale.

How has McLaren been performing?

McLaren’s interim results for the nine months ended 30 September 2020 revealed that revenue was down 61% (£389.2 million) from the same period in 2019 (£619.8 million). The decline has been attributed largely to Covid-19, as there was no income from race tickets or hospitality packages (McLaren Racing) and there was a reduction in vehicle wholesales (McLaren Automotive).

Gross profit for this period was down from £280.3 million to £15.2 million. On a more positive note, existing shareholders provided a £300 million equity injection prior to Covid-19, which funded the updates to McLaren’s five-year business plan.

What could the McLaren share price be?

It is not yet known what the McLaren share price could be when shares float, nor how many shares it will offer to the public.

The recent deal with MSP means McLaren could be looking at a valuation of around £560 million.

Who are McLaren's competitors?

McLaren’s competitors are Ferrari, Lamborghini, Porsche, Maserati and Tesla to name but a few. Out of these, Ferrari (RACE) and Tesla (TSLA) are directly listed.

In December 2020, Ferrari’s chief executive officer (CEO) quit, which caused the share price to dip slightly, but it made a swift recovery – confirming investor confidence. TSLA has had its fair share of growth in recent years, increasing by more than 700% from December 2019 to December 2020.

How do IPOs work?

IPOs work by having companies list their shares – market participants can then buy or sell the shares on the open market.

A company could list its shares for a number of reasons – these include raising capital to fund expansion, attracting and retaining talent, paying off debts, or improving liquidity.

The IPO process starts with the company making arrangements for a third party to conduct a comprehensive audit, in which all the company’s financials will be considered. Thereafter, it needs to get a registration statement ready to file with the relevant exchange commission. If the commission approves the registration, the company will list a specific number of shares on a stock exchange, at a price determined by an investment bank.

Explore what IPOs are or find out how to trade pre- and post-listing

What are the risks of trading or investing in an IPO?

All trading and investment activity involves risk. IPO-specific risks include:

  • Lack of important information on a company such as news and legal proceedings that might affect the share price
  • Little to no trading history to base decisions on
  • Performance that doesn't match up to market expectations
  • A company getting a valuation that’s lower than the one it targeted


By staying informed about the company and all details that might affect its share price, you’ll be avoiding risks that could affect your positions. In the case of IPOs, useful documents include company prospectuses and admission documents.

Register your interest for IPO news


For more info on how we might use your data, see our privacy notice and access policy and privacy webpage.

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1Based on revenue excluding FX (published financial statements, June 2020).
2 Tax laws are subject to change and depend on individual circumstances.