FCA definition

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The FCA, or Financial Conduct Authority, is the United Kingdom’s financial regulatory body. It is the successor to the FSA, or Financial Services Authority.

Founded in December 2012 (but only active from 2013 onwards), the FCA’s remit is to regulate the conduct of all retail and wholesale firms in the financial services industry. That includes banks, mutual societies, financial advisors and brokers.

The FCA operates independently of the UK government. Its financing is handled by fees levied on businesses and members of the financial services industry.

IG Index and IG Markets are authorised and regulated by the FCA.

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CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 79% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.
You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work, and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.
CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage.